Absence seizures involve brief, sudden lapses of consciousness. They're more common in children than in adults. Someone having an absence seizure may look like he or she is staring blankly into space for a few seconds. Then, there is a quick return to a normal level of alertness. This type of seizure usually doesn't lead to physical injury.
Absence seizures usually do not cause serious health problems. Some people also develop another type of seizure called a tonic-clonic seizure. This is a seizure that causes convulsions. Absence seizures are most common in children and adolescents. They can also start in adulthood. This is called an adult new-onset seizure. What are the signs ...
Absence seizures are commonly encountered in clinical practice. The diagnosis is usually straightforward in majority of cases. However, it may be challenging in patients with some atypical clinical or EEG features or less common epilepsy syndromes. This narrative review describes the clinical and EEG features, treatment and prognosis of the usual and the unusual
Absence seizures are brief, usually lasting only two to 10 seconds. There is no confusion after the seizure, and the person can usually resume full activity immediately. Children and Absence Seizures Expand Children and Absence Seizures Section. Parents often become very worried that they won’t even know when their child is having a seizure ...
Absence epilepsy is a primary generalized epilepsy. It is classified as typical or atypical absence depending on seizure characteristics and EEG pattern. Absence seizures are characterized by behavioral arrest and EEG showing 3-Hertz spike-and-wave discharges. Episodes usually occur multiple times per day.